Next Wave

Afrofuturism is trending

09-05-2018 in Color trends

A future African city form the movie Black Panther #textiletrends #trends #nextwave

Did you hear about the movie "Bar Star City" (release date TBA)?  It tells the story of a goddess, a war veteran and the captain of a spaceship meeting in a bar. It is the beginning of a trend called Afrofuturism.

The screenplay is written by afrofuturist Ytasha Womack. The movie became a media hype the day Womack started a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter. It was also the start of a genre and a way of thinking that blends Afro-culture, science fiction, magical realism, technology, and traditional African mysticism. It is about healing the black trauma but also about emerging African talents in architecture and design.

Blending things from African cultures, then creating them as if they had evolved over time

Filmset created by Hannah Beachler for Black Panther #textiletrends #trends #nextwave Filmset created by Hannah Beachler for Black Panther #textiletrends #trends #nextwave

Afrofuturism is the reimagining of a future filled with arts, science and technology seen through a black lens. The term was conceived a quarter-century ago by white author Mark Dery in his essay “Black to the Future”. The trend already past its point of significance when Marvel’s Black Panther comic books were adapted and released as a motion picture last winter.

Imagination is the fuel of innovation

Cabana, a cabinet from the Campana brothers for Edra. #textiletrends #trends #nextwave #edra Cabana, a cabinet from the Campana brothers for Edra. #textiletrends #trends #nextwave #edra

From Black Panther to Zaha Hadid

Although Africa has been producing creative talents over the past decade, it was not until Black Panther that the interest in afrofuturism was triggered. Some of the most voluptuous architectural creations in the motion picture are influenced by famous architect Zaha Hadid. All the reason for Dezeen magazine to publish an interview with Black Panther’s production designer Hannah Beachler, in which she states: "It was really about blending things that were existing in a lot of different African cultures, then creating them as if they had evolved over time and inserting that into our fictional nation." And as we know, imagination can change perception. It is the fuel of innovation.

Feldman architecture, California #textiletrends #trends #nextwave Feldman architecture, California #textiletrends #trends #nextwave

Call for Africa

Afrofuturism is a source of inspiration for designers. Edra’s Cabana, designed by Fernando and Humberto Campana could serve as an example. With its long synthetic raffia the cabinet is a tribute to the ancient African culture. Some of the actual robust designs are too. And Feldman Architecture created Afro inspired architecture.

African inspired robust design. #textiletrends #trends #nextwave African inspired robust design. #textiletrends #trends #nextwave

In textiles, designers drew inspiration from Afrofuturism. One very nice example comes from the Belgium editor Designs of the Time.

Noble Savage, upholstery by Designs of the Time, Belgium #textiletrends #trends #nextwave Noble Savage, upholstery by Designs of the Time, Belgium #textiletrends #trends #nextwave

Afrofuturism, a blend of Afro-culture with science fiction. The colours are dark, next to a vivid orange accent. #textiletrends #trends #nextwave Afrofuturism, a blend of Afro-culture with science fiction. The colours are dark, next to a vivid orange accent. #textiletrends #trends #nextwave

Dark Colours

Most recent colour predictions show at least a few dark colours. Colours that make you think of underexposed photos. Or what the human eye distinguishes when moving from bright sunlight into a room with scarce daylight. Heavily saturated colours. More like the promise of a colour. Feeling colour, rather than seeing it.

Francis Kere created this Afrofuturistic pavillion Francis Kere created this Afrofuturistic pavillion

abtout the author : Niek De Prest casts an eye on the future of textiledesign and textile industry.

Show address

Tour & Taxis
Havenlaan 88
1000 Brussel

Calculate route

Tickets

Online Ticket € 20
Tickets at the door € 40

Order your tickets

MoOD info

Mrs. Katrien De Smet
+32 (0) 9 241 95 63

katrien.desmet@easyfairs.com

Indigo info

Mrs. Charlotte Maes
+32 (0) 9 241 95 64

charlotte.maes@easyfairs.com

Copyright © 2018. MoOD & Indigo are events by Artexis Exhibitions NV, Maaltekouter 1, 9051 Gent, Sint-Denijs-Westrem. All rights reserved. VAT BE 0424.681.440

Web design en development by Lavagraphics